Love Letters

In a recent conversation with my Mother, she lamented over a comment one of her customers had made to her earlier that day.  She said: “This customer told me that they no longer teach children to write in cursive at school.  It upset me so…” My Mother is an artist – specifically, a master calligrapher by trade.  She works in beauty of the physical – combining her rare, heavily cultivated talent with her… Read more »


Love Letter to the Motor City

I have a secret.  Something that I’ve never told Eric, but I will divulge to you now. Growing up, I was pretty sure there was nothing good that came out of Michigan. Now, you have to understand that that particular sentiment was stemmed from the sports rivalries that spanned the generations.  Ohio State/Michigan.  Or, for someone who has been a basketball fanatic for as long as she can remember, the days of the Detroit Pistons’… Read more »


A Digital Rolling Stone 2.0

It seems only appropriate that I’m finally finishing the second installment of “A Digital Rolling Stone,” a month after the tenth anniversary of the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) suing Napster for allowing millions of consumers to download free, copyright music. In the first installment of “A Digital Rolling Stone” I hypothesized that the music industry must progress with culture in order to remain profitable and relevant by reflecting cultural trends and integrating technologies that create an experience for the consumer with added value. This hypothesis was composed over a year ago and I have collected several case studies that document this consumer behavioral transformation in regard to music and the brands that have effectively progressed with culture to create augmented experiences for the consumer. Also, I have also identified the casual attributes for marketing success and recommendations to continue these innovations in the music industry. Lastly, unlike artists before them, artists such as Radiohead and Trent Reznor of NIN understood not only the consumer, but the future of music. They paved the way for many musicians to find a sustainable business model in the digital age and seize OFF=ON opportunities. Welcome to “A Digital Rolling Stone 2.0”

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2010 SXSW Interactive Festival Panel Members Confirmed: "Big Brother in Your Brain: Neuroscience and Marketing"

For the past few months I have been working with the SXSW committee to finalize the members of the “Big Brother in Your Brain: Neuroscience and Marketing” panel for the 2010 SXSW Interactive Festival. And today I am proud to announce that SXSW has approved my shortlist and all speakers have confirmed their participation in the panel! The panel includes a diverse group of talented individuals from the fields of neuroscience, neuromarketing and marketing. Get ready for an engaging and thought-provoking conversation and debate on the convergence of cognitive neuroscience and marketing.

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2010 SXSW Interactive Festival Speaker and Panel

I am proud to announce that my panel idea, “Big Brother in Your Brain: Neuroscience and Marketing,” has been selected as a panel at the 2010 South by Southwest (SXSW) Interactive Festival in March in Austin, Texas. SXSW received more than 2,300 proposals via the SXSW PanelPicker submission process, a unique digital interface that allows the public to vote and provide feedback directly on panel proposals. My panel will be one of over 400 sessions included in SXSW 2010 and among the best of the best; including discussions led by innovators such as Clay Shirky and Chris Brogan and thought-provoking panels led by speakers from companies such as Microsoft, Google and Facebook; digital advertising agencies such as R/GA and Razorfish; and brilliant organizations such as TED.

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SXSW 2010 Interactive Festival

With the advent of neuromarketing, neuroscientist and researchers have been directing their expertise to marketing, using MRIs to analyze consumers’ brain activity when exposed to different stimuli. And companies like Google are using mathematics to develop advertising solutions. Will digital marketers become scientists and mathematicians or will creativity triumph? The founders of Modernista!, Lance Jensen and Gary Koepke, among others, will debate whether advertising is an art or science: Big Brother in Your Brain: Neuroscience and Marketing.

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Creativity: The Essence of Change

A look at creativity in advertising, an economic recession and its affect on urban revitalization. The great David Ogilvy once said, “It takes a big idea to attract the attention of consumers and get them to buy your product. Unless your advertising contains a big idea, it will pass like a ship in the night.” The essence of our industry is in big ideas and creativity. These elements help to communicate information in a persuasive manner by captivating the attention and interest of individuals. Big ideas and creativity can create brand awareness and in some cases even change brand perception, preference or image. The crucial point here, from a holistic perspective, is that big ideas and creativity are the answer to change – whether in advertising or other industries.

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The Convergence of Cognitive Neuroscience and Marketing

A few years ago, I read an article in the New York Times that explained the convergence of cognitive neuroscience and marketing. Since then I have been very interested in how advertising and marketing affects culture and more specifically how neuroscience could be applied to advertising. Will the convergence of neuroscience and marketing force our industry to become a science? And more importantly, should it? Is advertising an art or a science?

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Engaging and Innovative Interactive Navigation

The progression of interactive design has changed dramatically over the years. From a time when websites consisted only of hyperlinks, text and if you were lucky images. Now, interactive media such as photos, audio and video define the experience. Especially, with programs like Flash that allow the designer to augment the overall experience with creative aesthetics and animation. However, navigation has not followed the same progression.

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