the musCLE house

the musCLE house is a thriving music community where students receive one hour music lesson in exchange for one hour of philanthropic involvement or community service. Teachers provide instruction and mentorship, while also receiving payment with a unique structure. Teachers will enrich students with music education and students will improve the community they live in with philanthropic efforts.

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JAM

A new Chrome experiment from Google: An interactive web application that allows friends in different locations to play music together in Chrome on their computers. No matter what your level of experience – from music pros to aspiring air guitarists – you can JAM together in real time over the web.¬†Choose from a selection of 19 different instruments, from acoustic and bass guitars to drum kits and keyboards. Invite up to three friends to join… Read more »


Intentionally Passive Music Composition

Intentionally passive music composition has interested me for quite some time. This is the idea that we can create music by strategically planning for specific outcomes to create beautiful music; such as harnessing gravity, nature or the elements to create music organically. One of my favorite recent examples of this is Conductor, which harnesses the NYC subway system and turns it into an interactive string instrument.

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2011 SXSW Interactive Festival Panel – VOTE!

Over a month ago I submitted a panel proposal to the 2011 South by Southwest (SXSW) Interactive festival and am pleased to announce it has been included in the PanelPicker voting process! The panel is called “A Digital Rolling Stone: Disruptive Technology & Music” and it will analyze the current digital ecosystem to reveal the disruptive technologies and methods that will revolutionize the way music is created and experienced in the future.

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Unconsumption

When we were kids it was pretty much beaten into us that planet earth was in danger + the only way to save the planet was to “Reduce. Reuse. Recycle.” Perhaps because we learned this at a young age it’s second nature for us to want to limit the amount of “stuff” we contribute to landfills.

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A Digital Rolling Stone 2.0

It seems only appropriate that I’m finally finishing the second installment of “A Digital Rolling Stone,” a month after the tenth anniversary of the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) suing Napster for allowing millions of consumers to download free, copyright music. In the first installment of “A Digital Rolling Stone” I hypothesized that the music industry must progress with culture in order to remain profitable and relevant by reflecting cultural trends and integrating technologies that create an experience for the consumer with added value. This hypothesis was composed over a year ago and I have collected several case studies that document this consumer behavioral transformation in regard to music and the brands that have effectively progressed with culture to create augmented experiences for the consumer. Also, I have also identified the casual attributes for marketing success and recommendations to continue these innovations in the music industry. Lastly, unlike artists before them, artists such as Radiohead and Trent Reznor of NIN understood not only the consumer, but the future of music. They paved the way for many musicians to find a sustainable business model in the digital age and seize OFF=ON opportunities. Welcome to “A Digital Rolling Stone 2.0”

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The Convergence of Cognitive Neuroscience and Marketing

A few years ago, I read an article in the New York Times that explained the convergence of cognitive neuroscience and marketing. Since then I have been very interested in how advertising and marketing affects culture and more specifically how neuroscience could be applied to advertising. Will the convergence of neuroscience and marketing force our industry to become a science? And more importantly, should it? Is advertising an art or a science?

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A Digital Rolling Stone 1.0

Over the past few months, I have noticed that in the back of Rolling Stone there have been a few rotating lists such as Myspace Music Top 10 Songs, iLike Top Ten or iTunes Top 10 Songs. My personal favorite is the iLike Top Ten list, instead of determining popularity by sales; the list is actually determined by how many people actually listen to the song. This is a representation of how the music industry is changing now: By recognizing there are other ways to consume and listen to music (e.g. Pandora or Last.FM.). But how can they change moving forward? The music industry must integrate more technologies that create an experience for the consumer with added value. A perfect example of this is a big idea I read about in an AdAge DigitalNext article. The article explained how Drop.io and Organic are collaborating on a new technology platform: location-based file sharing.

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The Nike+ Human Race

When Nike and Apple created the Nike+iPod device, I’m not quite sure if they knew the exact impact that it would have on the brand. Not only does the product balance form (simple, modern design) and function (allowing users to track the elapsed time of the workout, the distance traveled, pace, or calories burned), but it also fosters a growing relationship with the consumer through an engaging brand experience. The Nike+iPod website (developed by R/GA) is compelling in both design and functionality.

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